Help! Need GF, Vegetarian, & Vegan Recipes / Tips on Reducing Sugar Intake/ Portion Control

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  96037 4 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • #914803

    Kim
    Participant

    When my friend went vegan, he was so strict about eating that he wouldn’t eat out unless it was a vegan restaurant. He wouldn’t even have anything vegetarian. He asked about every food before he ordered it, if it had milk or cheese or meat or even what kind of oil was used in cooking. (He won’t eat anything cooked in Canola or vegetable or soy oil, only olive or coconut oil.) I actually recommend that too though as anything that is a concentrate or refined oil can be bad for you. The best oils to cook high temperature foods with are pure plain olive oil (not virgin), grapeseed oil and coconut oil. For a cold oil for salads and such, use extra virgin olive oil, melted coconut, avocado or flax oil. All other oils should be avoided for various reasons. Anyway, getting back to my friend, it was almost impossible to eat out anywhere with him but at the same time he was so committed to his diet that he made way more healthy recipes at home and never got sidetracked by friends or others wanting to eat out unless he could order vegan options. I wasn’t as strict about it because honestly if I am starving and I see a hamburger place open, I will eat a hamburger rather than starve but I only maybe do that once a week so will say to myself, I already ate at a fast food place this week and should make better food choices the rest of the week.

    If you can’t avoid going out though with friends or family, just try and choose healthier options wherever you are. For example, at burger places, burger themselves are not that bad, but avoid the cheese and bacon on anything and get lettuce and tomato instead. If you can eat the bun, pick whole wheat over white or get it without the bun. Avoid french fries and get maybe two burgers or chicken pieces instead as the protein is much better for you than the empty carsb in deep fried potatoes. Avoid milkshakes and pop and get fruit juice or water instead. If at a Chinese or Asian restaurant, try to get brown rice or steamed rice or rice noodles rather than friend rice. Get steamed veggies rather than fried or deep fried and try and eat meat that hasn’t been breaded or deep fried. I like picking Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese or Indian food over Chinese. Anything with curry is healthy and drinking green tea or fresh fruit smoothies or bubble tea is healthier than pop.

    Another suggestion is if you have trouble knowing when you are full or to stop eating, eat more slowly. It takes the body 20-30 minutes to recognize if it’s full so if you go to a buffet for example or Christmas dinner and eat two platefuls of food in under twenty min., you will not even feel it until after you realize you’ve eaten too much. If you eat more slowly and chew your food thoroughly, it will help your body absorb nutrients more and digest better and if you are still working on one plate of food after 20 min and then realize you are full, you won’t eat as much. The fist sized portion applies to side dishes as well so if you have a fist sized piece of meat, you should also have a fist sized potato or rice or something similar side plus a fist size serving of vegetables. If you feel like you need more though, only take more veggies, rather than meat or carbs. If you are trying for low carbs, some people will skip the rice or potato and just have two servings of veggies or a salad instead. A low carb diet will help you lose weight because if your body doesn’t get enough sugars from carbs, it will go into something called ketosis and start burning fat instead of sugar. My friend also sticks to a low carb diet but it isn’t for everyone. I have experienced ketosis and wasn’t comfortable with it as I already have low blood sugar. You do need carbs for energy and my suggestion would be if you eat a lot of carbs, to make sure you are doing lots of exercise to burn them off. Carbs are good for energy before exercise and protein is good after exercise to restore and repair muscles.

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    #914863

    Dragoneer_88
    Participant

    I don’t think I can be too strict with a diet like that at first. For me personally, it would set me up for a hard fall later on.
    I try to avoid processed oils as much as possible because I suffer from adult acne. I’ve found out through trail that corn syrup and corolla oil will cause my acne to flare up something terrible. Soy will too and it messes with my hormones, like you mentioned earlier. I was told a story about a woman who raised her daughter on a soy heavy diet and now, as an adult, her daughter sufferers from a lot of health issues. Their doctor said it was the soy. So if I eat soy, it’s in small amounts. It difficult to escape it completely because it’s in a lot of foods.

    #914864

    Lauren
    Participant

    I don’t think I can be too strict with a diet like that at first. For me personally, it would set me up for a hard fall later on.
    I try to avoid processed oils as much as possible because I suffer from adult acne. I’ve found out through trail that corn syrup and corolla oil will cause my acne to flare up something terrible. Soy will too and it messes with my hormones, like you mentioned earlier. I was told a story about a woman who raised her daughter on a soy heavy diet and now, as an adult, her daughter sufferers from a lot of health issues. Their doctor said it was the soy. So if I eat soy, it’s in small amounts. It difficult to escape it completely because it’s in a lot of foods.

    Growing up, one of my friends had a severe food allergy for corn fructose. Soy, wheat, gluten, and corn fructose are in practically *everything* these days. So it was very difficult for them to find hardly anything she could eat, and I imagine that for you or for anyone trying to avoid any of those products it’s a very difficult time. (Heck, I looked at the back of the sauce I was recommending for a recipe to you the other day, and the very *first* ingredient involved gluten. 🙁 I felt pretty bad.) I don’t know much, or hardly anything, about food production, but the heavy prevalence of these things in the food we consume seems like overkill.

    #914876

    Dragoneer_88
    Participant

    I don’t think I can be too strict with a diet like that at first. For me personally, it would set me up for a hard fall later on.
    I try to avoid processed oils as much as possible because I suffer from adult acne. I’ve found out through trail that corn syrup and corolla oil will cause my acne to flare up something terrible. Soy will too and it messes with my hormones, like you mentioned earlier. I was told a story about a woman who raised her daughter on a soy heavy diet and now, as an adult, her daughter sufferers from a lot of health issues. Their doctor said it was the soy. So if I eat soy, it’s in small amounts. It difficult to escape it completely because it’s in a lot of foods.

    Growing up, one of my friends had a severe food allergy for corn fructose. Soy, wheat, gluten, and corn fructose are in practically *everything* these days. So it was very difficult for them to find hardly anything she could eat, and I imagine that for you or for anyone trying to avoid any of those products it’s a very difficult time. (Heck, I looked at the back of the sauce I was recommending for a recipe to you the other day, and the very *first* ingredient involved gluten. 🙁 I felt pretty bad.) I don’t know much, or hardly anything, about food production, but the heavy prevalence of these things in the food we consume seems like overkill.

    For sure! These ingredient are very difficult to avoid unless you go an a diet much like Kim described. They say American foods are the worst. I wouldn’t know because I’ve never been abroad for comparison (outside the U.S. I mean). My uncle liked to say Kraft American cheese slices were 1 molecule away from being plastic. And they market a lot of that unhealthy stuff towards kids. Then there’s the things marketed as “healthy” like Sunchips. They are not. Shameful. Even the things you wouldn’t think would have those bad ingredients in them do. Puffed rice cereals have some kind of preservative that’s used in tire making apparently.
    I used to eat Starcrunch patties when I was a kid. They’re made by Little Debbie I think? Anyway, it had been years since I had one and I thought I’d get one. Looked at the ingredients list on the box and wholly molly! Was I reading an ingredients list or a book prologue? Needless to say, I didn’t get any of those. Heh. You’d think with all these things I have to avoid I’d be thinner. LOL. It must be the sugar and portion size.

    Don’t feel bad. I appreciate you taking the time to help and post some info. I’ve learned some things from your posts too and taken notes. Feel free add more info if you like. 😉 Besides, I would have read the ingredients on it before using. I don’t have allergies to gluten (I don’t think. Unless IBS can be considered an allergic reaction.), but I was advised to avoid it due to family health (or lack there of) history. No recipe is set in stone. Actually, I don’t think I ever follow a recipe exactly. I tend to modify them to meet my tastes/needs. Uh, that is when I do cook meal based off a recipe, which isn’t too often. I need to change that. :p

    #914893

    Kiya
    Participant

    The good news on the sauce front at least is that you can make most sauces easily enough. If you Google recipes for things you like (peanut sauce, ranch dressing, mayo, etc), then you can generally find a simple way to make it at home. It doesn’t always last as long, but then you can control the ingredients.

    #914909

    Lauren
    Participant

    Kiya is right about sauces and whatnot. At least, things like ketchup or mustard or bbq sauce, you can find recipes and modify them and make them into things that you can eat, have less perservatives, and are generally much more healthy for you. It does take more time, though, which I think is kind of at the heart of the problem… a lot of people just don’t have time, after you factor in work and sleep, to be able to make all these things for themselves. It’s why food production became a thing in the first place, I think. But it’s just gotten out of control.

    I don’t know what things are like in Europe, having never been there, or in many parts of Asia. In Japan, soy and rice are everywhere, sodium is never reduced either, and wheat and gluten removal is kind of unheard of. MSG is also included in a lot of things like ‘dashi,’ which is commonly used as a part of soup stock here. Food allergies and sensitivities seem to be less common here, though, so maybe the removal of these things is not so necessary. (But then, for those rare cases who DO have problems, getting access to non gluten, wheat, or soy-exposed foods are just that much harder.) In general though I would say I trust Japanese food a lot more than I ever did food back home–I will eat things here totally uncooked that I would never dream of touching back in America.

    #916380

    Setsunawolf
    Participant

    A word about the sugar addiction from a hypoglycemic. You can eat sugar. You can even do it daily, just do it in small portions. Like a piece of chocolate once a day instead of the entire bar. You don’t need to feel bad about eating it or wanting it, if fact studies have shown (infomercial music here) that by denying yourself it and making yourself feel about eating sugary foods actually makes the problem worse. Enjoy your traets just eat a small amount. It’s hard at first, but it does get easier. 🙂

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    #916381

    Ela_Hara
    Participant

    A great, free online site that you can use to count calories, log exercise and see daily food intake, etc., is MyFitnessPal.com – it’s really fabulous and effortless to track what you are eating per day and such. Check it out. 😀

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    #916483

    Jennifer
    Keymaster

    I don’t think I can be too strict with a diet like that at first. For me personally, it would set me up for a hard fall later on.
    I try to avoid processed oils as much as possible because I suffer from adult acne. I’ve found out through trail that corn syrup and corolla oil will cause my acne to flare up something terrible. Soy will too and it messes with my hormones, like you mentioned earlier. I was told a story about a woman who raised her daughter on a soy heavy diet and now, as an adult, her daughter sufferers from a lot of health issues. Their doctor said it was the soy. So if I eat soy, it’s in small amounts. It difficult to escape it completely because it’s in a lot of foods.

    Growing up, one of my friends had a severe food allergy for corn fructose. Soy, wheat, gluten, and corn fructose are in practically *everything* these days. So it was very difficult for them to find hardly anything she could eat, and I imagine that for you or for anyone trying to avoid any of those products it’s a very difficult time. (Heck, I looked at the back of the sauce I was recommending for a recipe to you the other day, and the very *first* ingredient involved gluten. 🙁 I felt pretty bad.) I don’t know much, or hardly anything, about food production, but the heavy prevalence of these things in the food we consume seems like overkill.

    I also avoid corn, soy, modern wheat, canola, etc. It has made me really look at labels and in the end, anymore, I pretty much avoid the central part of the grocery store. Most boxed, bagged, and processed foods just don’t even make it into our house these days. I try my hardest to pretty much just cook with whole ingredients, carefully sourced (or grown myself). Eating locally, seasonally, and with whole food components took a few years to ease into, for me. It was hard, and hard to source stuff at first. I know it’s not for everyone so I am not trying to suggest it or force it onto anyone. But– It has helped me to almost completely avoid the questionable ingredients in food. It is more work but it is very rewarding to me, even with my crazy busy schedule. I love connecting with local growers and farmers, and I have made new friends this way. It’s super awesome to be able to trade a food that I have too much of for one that I want! My meals have a new sense of pride, because I know where 99% of the ingredients came from, very directly. I still do buy some non-local foods (what can I say, I love avocados), but the bulk of our food is now sourced from local farms and small time growers.
    This may sound stupid, but I think it has also improved my sense of taste? I can not prove this and it might just be in my head, but since I have stopped deluging my body with sugars, salts, artificial flavors, MSG (yes really– it is in a lot of americal snack foods, even ‘more healthy’ choices such as crackers! I used to love “low fat” cheese nips), etc… over the long term… It seems like I taste more complex and wonderful flavors in the foods I used to consider bland?

    Anyhow. That’s my experience. Yours may vary. 🙂

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    #916485

    96037
    Participant

    well i had to change my entire diet now so I am paleo. it fit that description axcept for there is meat. you could research vegetarian paleo? sorry, i had really meant to get back to this thread, i totallt forgot… 🙁

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